7 Tips for Pool and Water Park Safety

pool safety

If you like the water and being outdoors, swimming can be one of the most fun summertime activities. It’s something the entire family can enjoy. Beautiful weather and freer schedules for kids out of school for the summer often means a lot of time spent at the pool or water parks. While both of these are awesome options for a day off in the summer, it’s important to keep safety in mind. In order to make the most out of your water-filled day in the sun, you’ll obviously want to do your best to prevent any accidents or injuries from occurring. Check out these 7 tips for staying safe at the pool or water park this summer.

  1. Stay Alert

First and foremost, it’s important than parents and guardians everywhere keep an eye on their kids at all times. Drowning can occur in a split-second, so make sure you don’t lose sight of your kids. Don’t try to use this time to multitask.

  1. Don’t Neglect the Sunscreen

Put sunscreen on everyone before even leaving the house. Apply religiously throughout the day, especially for toddlers.

  1. Agree on a Meeting Place

Especially if you’re at a water park, it can be a great idea to agree on a meeting place with the rest of your group. If something happens and one or a couple of you get separated, it can be so beneficial to agree on a place to find each other.

  1. Obey the Rules

Usually one of the first rules of the pool or water park is No Running. According to New York slip and fall accident lawyer, David Resnick & Associates, slip and fall injuries are the most common claims in premises liability lawsuits. There will most likely be lifeguards on duty, but don’t just leave it up to them to make sure your kids are following the rules. Don’t be afraid to yell ‘No Running’ at one point or another. Remember that the rules are in place for you and your kids’ safety.

  1. Bring a Hat and Loose Shirt

Hats are always a good idea – not only will they help keep the sun out of your eyes, but they’ll also help it stay off of your face as well. In case you end up getting a little bit too much sun exposure, you might want to have a loose shirt as well. Keep track of how much sun your kids are getting, especially toddlers.

  1. Understand the Danger of Drains

Drain covers or grates are such an easy place for a piece of clothing, jewelry or hair to get stuck. If the suction is too powerful, it’s possible that a child could get stuck under water. Make sure you teach your children the importance of staying away from drains.  

  1. Stay Educated

Take the time to make sure everyone in your family knows how to swim. Swim lessons are a great idea just to be safe. Additionally, you might take a CPR class so that you’ll know what to do in case of emergency.

 

Why Not to Rely Too Heavily on Lifeguards: What Can You Do to Be Prepared?

lifeguards

In the peak summer season, time spent at the pool, ocean and lake is increased drastically. This means an awesome time spent keeping cool with your family and friends, but it can also mean huge crowds in the water. With so much going on in the water and so many people around, swimming in oceans, lakes or pools can be dangerous. Luckily, there are lifeguards set in place in many areas to oversee everything that is going on. However, it’s important not to rely 100% on lifeguards, especially during peak busy season. So why shouldn’t you rely too heavy on lifeguards? What can you do to create a sturdy foundation for yourself and your family?

Lifeguards Can’t Physically Watch Everyone

Lifeguards are taught to scan areas, using a slight arch in their scan from one side to the other and then dipping the gaze down to bring their scan back in the opposite direction. Aside from the many different techniques in scanning that can be used, lifeguards are humans just like you and I. There is imperfection in humankind, and it’s important to rely entirely on one person who could make a mistake at any time.

Of course it’s crucial that lifeguards do their job to the best of their ability, but when there are hundreds of people swimming, it’s physically impossible to look at each individual person at all times. If you notice a lifeguard who’s head isn’t moving as they scan, or they are talking with someone and not looking at the water in front of the, let someone in authority know.

Lifeguards Want You to Watch Your Kids

Do you have children? It’s necessary to watch them at all times in the water, especially if your kids are younger. It might be easy to get caught up in chatting to a neighbor or friend while you’re at the pool, but it really only takes a split second for something to happen. It makes it much easier for lifeguards to do their job in ensuring no one is drowning when you’re keeping your toddlers from falling into the deep end.

It Can Be Incredibly Difficult to See

Think about when you’re at the lake or the ocean – the water is often a deep, dark color with debris floating throughout. Additionally, if you’re at a pool with that’s packed with swimmers, it can be difficult to assess what is happening at all times. Lifeguards must quickly evaluate what’s going on in front of them to know the difference between playing, roughhousing and drowning.

According to Mani Ellis & Layne, injury attorneys in Charleston, many types of injuries can result from reckless or dangerous behavior of others. If you see people getting rough in the water, it’s important to let a lifeguard know so they can put an end to it immediately.

What Can You Do?

One of the most important things you can do is to make sure you and your family knows how to swim as well as how to perform CPR.

Never swim alone! Grab a friend or family member before you run into the ocean. Have a buddy with you at all times so that if anything happens to either of you, someone else knows exactly where you are and can potentially help.

If you have kids, watch them! This comes with the responsibility of being in charge of another human life. Don’t leave it up to the lifeguard who could have hundreds of other kids to watch.

Be careful of rip currents. If you get stuck in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore until you make it out. Otherwise you could get too tired and lose enough power and energy to make it to safety.

Summer Activities for Individuals of All Abilities

summer activities for all abilities

Summer is the season for taking advantage of the great outdoors and to get moving after a long winter. Whether you enjoy water sports, taking in the sights and sounds of a nature hike, or even like to spend the weekend camping, there are many fun summer activities that individuals of all abilities can enjoy. Put on your sunscreen, grab a water bottle, a pair of sunglasses, and try some of these quintessential summer activities:

Gardening and Grilling

 

Nothing says “summer” like getting a little dirty or gathering with friends in the backyard for some food and fun. Traditionally, gardening can be labor intensive, but there are so many ways to garden that one does not need to get down on his or her knees or use heavy garden tools to be a successful gardener. Gardening is activity that can be done as a group or as a solo project, all one needs is soil, seeds, water, and a sunny spot. Container gardening is an easy way to garden for individuals with disabilities who have limited space or have limited mobility. For example, if someone is bound to a wheelchair, he or she can tend to a container gardening if pots (or other containers) are at level within reach. Another great way to garden is by joining or helping out at a community garden. Not only can you reap the benefits of fresh food, but meet other individuals of all abilities in your community.

 

Another summer activity that is suitable for individuals of all abilities is a backyard grilling party. Who doesn’t love to gather around a campfire or grill, share delicious foods with good friends, and even enjoy a few backyard games?

Water Fun

 

Cooling off in water during a warm afternoon is one of the best ways to enjoy summer. While some individuals like to take the plunge at the waterpark or pool, there are several other water activities that all abilities can enjoy. If you enjoy boating and swimming, check with your local community education and recreation department to see if they offer adaptive water sports such as kayaking, canoeing, and sailing. Want to hit the pool? Check to see if your local pool has an accessible pool.

Summer Camps

 

Attending a summer camp seems to be a rite of passage for many individuals. These days, there’s a summer camp for almost every interest and ability. Summer camps can be an invaluable experience for young and old, alike, and can be beneficial in many ways including: meeting others with similar interests, enjoying a nice getaway from everyday life, learn new skills, discover certain talents, gain self-confidence, and enjoy some independence.

 

If attending a summer camp isn’t your thing, camping in a campground can be a fun way to get away for a night or two. Many campgrounds have accessible camping cabins if pitching a tent isn’t an option and during the day, you can enjoy a nice nature hike on accessible trails or partake in other activities in the area.