5 Signs You’re Not Sleeping Enough


We know the importance of sleep and the negative repercussions that are experienced when we don’t receive the recommended eight or more hours per night. Did you know that the negative impact and reach further than just being tired and grumpy? Sleep plays a much larger role in your health and overall wellbeing. Consider the following signs to see if you’re getting enough sleep:


Lack of Sleep Causes Accidents


When you’ve been deprived of sleep your mind has a slower reaction time to respond. As reported by WebMD.com, “studies have shown the loss of sleep and low-quality sleep can lead to accidents and injuries on the job.” Robbing yourself of the appropriate amount of sleep is a hazard and one that can follow you to work and result in a workplace accident that can put you out of work for months.


Lack of sleep can also put you at risk behind the wheel. When considering delayed reaction time as a result of drowsiness, it would be wise to think twice before endangering the lives of others and yourself.




It has also been reported that those who aren’t getting adequate sleep are more prone to experience signs of depression. In fact, the lack of sleep can aggravate symptoms of depression that can even make it more difficult to fall asleep.


Keep in mind that if you experience a restless night or two you’re not going to experience severe depression or develop insomnia, these results are a result of long term effects. If you’re having trouble sleeping or falling asleep, evaluate your nightly ritual and determine if you’re taking the necessary steps for a good night slumber.


Looking Aged


Another sign that you’re not getting enough rest is looking aged and older than you are. Extensive loss of sleep can lead to your body producing cortisol, a stress hormone that breaks down skin collagen. It’s not called beauty rest for nothing. Consider if you’re seeing fine lines, dark circles under the eyes, and skin that lacks in color. Looking your best means feeling your best. Do yourself a favor and get the sleep you need for younger looking skins.


Weight Gain


Another signal that you might be losing on the snoozing, is an increase in your weight. Loss of sleep can trigger an appetite. When you are losing out on the sleep your body needs, your body send mixed signals which is the result of being hungry, particularly for foods that are high in fat and carbohydrates. If you’re looking to shed a few pounds, the result could be as easily as sleeping it off.


Health Issues


By this point, it’s obvious that sleep is a detrimental part of our daily routines; however, it should also be noted that an experience in sleep loss can be a severe risk to your health. A few risks to consider can be that of diabetes, heart disease, heart attacks, and high blood pressure. Considering these high-risk factors of sleep loss, it would be in your best interest to make yourself get enough sleep each night. Avoiding these health hazards by sleeping is an easy way to promote wellness in your everyday routine.


We understand the importance of getting a good night’s sleep and symptoms that could entail that we’re not getting enough. Consider monitoring your sleep and review your daily routine to determine whether you should be making changes.


What are other signs that you’re not getting enough sleep?

What You Need to Know about PTSD and How You Can Prevent it from Controlling Your Life

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a disorder that can develop after experiencing any kind of shocking event. Often times, people associate PTSD with members of the armed forces. While there are people in the military who do develop this disorder after a traumatic event, it can also occur in people who are involved in car accidents, have undergone a surgery or who have experienced a loved one passing away.

According to auto accident attorneys at Millar and Mixon, if you have been in a motor vehicle accident of any kind, you could be at risk of developing PTSD. If you start to notice signs or symptoms, it’s important that you speak with your doctor right away.

Symptoms of PTSD typically begin early – within 3 months of the incident – though there are situations where they can start to arise years later. Because each individual’s situation is so different, the course of the disorder will always vary. Some people recover after 6 months, while for others it can take years to heal.

There are several different types of symptoms that can be seen in PTSD. Re-experiencing symptoms include flashbacks, bad dreams and frightening thoughts. Avoidance symptoms are things such as not visiting certain places and avoiding feelings or thoughts that trigger certain memories. Arousal and reactivity symptoms include the feeling of constantly being on edge or tense. Negative thoughts and loss of interest in enjoyable activities are cognition and mood symptoms.

If you have PTSD, what kinds of treatments are out there that might help? What can you do to stop PTSD from taking a hold of your life?

Cognitive Therapy

Your therapist will help you understand how to change your thoughts and ideas about your trauma and its aftermath. Your goal is to understand how your negative thoughts are bringing on more stress and ultimately worsening your symptoms. Replacing these thoughts with less destructive ones is key as well as learning to cope with feelings of guilt, fear and anger.

Exposure Therapy

Having less fear regarding your memories is the goal with exposure therapy. You’ll learn to take charge of your memories and ultimately show them you’re not afraid or overwhelmed by them anymore.

Group Therapy

For many people, it can help to talk your situation out with others in similar circumstances. Simply knowing you’re not the only person experiencing these thoughts and emotions can help immensely. Sharing your issues can also help build trust and confidence in yourself.

Family Therapy

Involving your whole family is important, especially if your situation has lead to a lack of communication between you and the people you love. Everyone will have the chance to express their feelings open and honestly. This can also help your family be better equipped to support you.

The most important thing is to not lose faith. Stay positive and know that with perseverance, you’ll come out of this a stronger person.

Understanding Malignant Mesothelioma

If you have ever been exposed to asbestos in your lifetime, you’re at a greater risk of being diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma at some point in your life. Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive form of cancer that most often forms in the lungs, chest wall, or abdomen and may also affect the heart or testicles. While malignant mesothelioma is rare, affecting about 3,000 people per year, the diagnosis is often an advanced stage due to the latency period that can be anywhere from 10 to 50 years.

Asbestos Exposure


Asbestos is a natural silicate mineral that was popularly used in a variety of products (particularly between the 1930’s and ‘50s), from housing materials to automotive parts, for its heat-resistant and fire-proof properties. It wasn’t until the 1970’s, when the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began to ban the use of asbestos in certain products, that people started to take notice that asbestos may actually be harmful to the environment and to individuals who work with or live around it.


Any home or industrial building that was built prior to 1980 may have been constructed or insulated with asbestos related materials and while the risk of exposure may be low, particularly when such materials are in good condition and have not been manipulated, no exposure to asbestos is considered “safe”.


Individuals who worked in an occupational field that had contact with asbestos related materials are at a greater risk of developing malignant mesothelioma. Such occupations may include, but are not limited to: electricians, mechanics, HVAC workers, Navy shipyard workers, firefighters, and construction workers. Additionally, family members of individuals who worked with or around asbestos may also be at a high risk due to the exposure carried on the skin or clothing.

Signs & Symptoms


The signs and symptoms of malignant mesothelioma may vary depending on where the cancer occurs and how advanced the cancer may be. According to the Mayo Clinic, the signs and symptoms of pleural mesothelioma (which affects the lungs) includes, but is not limited to: chest pain under the rib cage, painful coughing, shortness of breath, and unusual lumps under the chest. Peritoneal mesothelioma (which affects the abdomen) may be identified through abdominal pain and swelling, lumps in the abdomen, and unexplained weight loss. If mesothelioma affects the heart or testicles, individuals may experience pain and swelling in the affected area.


Since the signs and symptoms of malignant mesothelioma are similar to other types of illness or disease, it’s important to visit a doctor as soon as possible and be sure to report if you know or suspect that you have been exposed to asbestos.

Treatment Options


Like other types of cancer, your doctor will discuss treatment options once the malignant mesothelioma is found and staged. Treatment plans vary based upon the location and size of the tumor and whether or not it has spread to lymph nodes, organs, and other parts of your body. The most common treatment options include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination of any of the treatments. Since malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer, there is no “tried and true” treatment and some individuals, under the guidance of their doctors, may be able to try alternative treatments or be eligible for clinical trials.